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History: A Short History of Nemiscam National Park

Reprinted from the October 1950
 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

A Short History of Nemiscam National Park By E. Matthews, Nemiscam, Alta. ‘After the rangeland South of Bow Island in Alberta and for miles east and west was thrown open to homesteading, the need for some protection of the large number of antelope was apparent, and quickly became an immediate and pressing necessity if the […] Read more


History: “Charlie” Knox – Pioneer Western Canadian Stockman

Reprinted from the October 1950
 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

“Charlie” Knox – Pioneer Western Canadian Stockman By Guy Weadick, High River, Alta. ‘Probably no other individual had more to do with the early development and creation of interest in markets for the open range Western Canadian livestock industry than did “Charlie” Knox, whose activities in that field extended from 1883, when he first hit […] Read more



History: Bunkhouse philosophy

Reprinted from the September 1950
 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Bunkhouse philosophy (a monthly column) By W.R. Cochrane, Crowley, Alta.
 Things have changed quite a bit since the old days when it was the accepted custom either to drive your beef to the nearest railway point and ship them yourself to one of the central markets in this country, or if you were willing to […] Read more


History: Buffalo Park Grazing Ass’n Community Pasture

Reprinted from the November 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

By Capt. K.S. Tory, Wainwright, Alta.
 In this rich ranching country of Alberta the big name ranches and ranchers, and ranches with romantic backgrounds steeped in the traditions of the Alberta cattle story, are liable to obscure the less romantic but just as vital little ranch lay-outs known as Community Pastures. Such a little lay-out, […] Read more



History: Those Wild “Payment” Days at Old Fort Pitt

Reprinted from the October 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Those Wild “Payment” Days at Old Fort Pitt By WM. Bleasdell Cameron, Meadow Lake, Sask. ‘When Indian Agent Tom Quinn came down from his headquarters at Frog Lake to the old Hudson’s Bay Company’s trading post of Fort Pitt on the North Saskatchewan river to “pay treaty” to the members of Chief Big Bear’s turbulent […] Read more


History: Bull Teams of the Cariboo

Reprinted from the October 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Bull Teams of the Cariboo By P. W. Luce, Vancouver, B.C. ‘Motor freighting began during the First World War. Before that the lumbering wagons had been drawn by horses and oxen, and the horses stayed on the road until the early twenties. The oxen passed out of the picture at the turn of the century. […] Read more



History: Reflections from a California Feedlot

Reprinted from the October 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Reflections from a California Feedlot By Mary Terrill, Medicine Hat, Alta. ‘From a low hill at Collinsville, California, I gazed with mixed feelings on the biggest feed-yards in the West. It was built on the delta of the river, across the Bay from San Francisco, where the mighty Sacramento holds back the sea. It was […] Read more


History: Cattle Empire

Reprinted from the September 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

By Lewis Nordyke A book review by Sheilagh S. Jameson Cattle Empire, the fabulous story of the 3-million acre XIT ranch of Texas, provides proof of that old maxim that “truth is stranger than fiction.” It records the history of the biggest ranch in the United States of America, of the building of the largest […] Read more



History: The Outlaws of the Cariboo

Reprinted from the September 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

The Outlaws of the Cariboo By P. W. Luce, Vancouver, B.C. ‘Suicide Valley is the ominous name of a place four miles south of Clinton, a town of considerable importance in the gold days of the Cariboo. Some unremembered prospector hanged himself there long ago, but today the sheltered spot might well be called Double […] Read more


History: The First Public Picnic and Stampede to Be Held on the Milk River in Alberta

Reprinted from the September 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

The First Public Picnic and Stampede to Be Held on the Milk River in Alberta By Harry C. Smith, Milk River, Alta. ‘It was while doing homestead duties in the latter part of May of 1910, in the Writing-on-Stone district, that Dean Smith, Fred Miller and I were talking one evening in the shack on […] Read more