Latest articles


The not-so sexy side of genomics

Breeding: News Roundup from the October 23, 2017 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

New technologies are sexy if they meet three criteria: they open doors to new and wonderful things, they are disruptive, and they are profitable. Genomics is proving to be one of the sexiest technologies in history. All living things are based on DNA and so genomics, the study and manipulation of that DNA, can have […] Read more


cattle eating hay in the winter

Stretching your hay supply with straw

Feed: News Roundup from the October 23, 2017 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Travis Peardon, the regional livestock specialist in Outlook, Sask., says few producers were reporting an abundance of hay this year, so he presumes many will be stretching what they do have with straw to get their cows through the winter. That being the case, Peardon recently prepared a short primer on straw-bolstered rations for producers […] Read more



cows eating pellets- Glen Nicoll

Albertans urged to test winter feeds

Feed: News Roundup from the October 23, 2017 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Albertans are being advised to test their winter forage supplies this fall. “Livestock feed supplies are going to be tight in some areas of Alberta, while in other areas, quality may be an issue,” says Andrea Hanson, beef extension specialist with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry. Testing identifies the nutrients available so the ration can be […] Read more


TPP gets a shot in the arm

Trade: News Roundup from the October 23, 2017 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

On September 30 Global Affairs Canada gave the cattle industry a shot in the arm by officially opening consultations with the Canadian public over a renewed agreement with the remaining countries in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). The original agreement among 12 Asian-Pacific countries — Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, […] Read more



The economics of preg-checking

Research: News Roundup from the October 2017 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

The major economic benefit of preg-checking is the money saved by not wintering open cows. However, it has been noted that preg-checking is not always worthwhile, as the increased revenue due to higher prices for cows in the spring and the additional weights put on in the winter could more than offset winter feeding costs. […] Read more


Technology Access Centre chalks up its first year

Research: News Roundup from the October 2017 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

The Technology Access Centre (TAC) for Livestock Production at Olds College, Olds, Alta., has moved from a funding announcement little more than a year ago to a full-fledged service under the umbrella of the college’s applied research arm, the Centre for Innovation. TAC was established with a National Science and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) grant […] Read more



BI helps get cattle out of the fire zone

Community: News Roundup from the October 2017 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health has purchased a portable cattle handling system to help ranchers affected by the ongoing wildfires in British Columbia’s interior. The equipment includes a tub and chute on wheels and freestanding range panels, six feet high and 24 feet long, heavy enough to handle range cattle, says Maury Grant, Boehringer Ingelheim’s rep […] Read more


Fine tuning forage corn agronomics

Feed: News Roundup from the October 2017 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

The first year of a three-year corn silage study in Saskatchewan showed a trend toward yield differences between two seed brands across the province’s corn heat unit (CHU) zones. “One brand out-yielded the other in short-season zones and the other brand had the best yields in the longer-season zones,” says Dr. Joy Agnew, project manager […] Read more



cattle grazing a pasture with blue sky in the background

Be TRU to yourself

Education: News Roundup from the September 2017 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

I have been quite concerned over the last few years about the direction in which the agricultural industry is headed. We have been pushed down a road of quick fixes for quite some time. What we really need are long-term solutions to the problems. Environment and health care are two of the big issues we […] Read more


A close up on a nutrition facts label

U.S. group views Healthy Eating Strategy labels as trade barrier

Policy: News Roundup from the September 2017 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

While all of agriculture is focused on retaining market access to the U.S. and Mexico embedded in the North American Free Trade Agreement, the North American Meat Institute (NAMI) based in Washington, D.C., is just as concerned about proposed changes to Canada’s food labels. In an August 15 letter to United States Trade Representative Robert […] Read more