Latest articles


History: Calgary’s 1950 Stampede Makes History

Reprinted from the August 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Calgary’s 1950 Stampede Makes History By Lorne Stout, Calgary, Alta. ‘The story of the 1950 Calgary Stampede is a story of rain, millions of dollars worth of rain, when converted to grass, grain, flour and beef, but it gave Stampede officials, contestants and 373,135 visitors to the big show headaches and heartaches. Pelting down at […] Read more


History: Shaunavan tales – Bronk riding in the parlor

Reprinted from the September 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Shaunavan tales – Bronk riding in the parlor (1903) By Hugo Maguire, Shaunavon, Sask. ‘Johnny Smart had been punching cows for the V outfit north of Maple Creek. During the summer the work was finished and Johnny rode to Maple Creek. He bought the best suit of clothes in Dixon Bros. store. He also bought […] Read more



History: The Morley Trading Post

Reprinted from the August 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Thousands of travellers on the Canadian Pacific Railway going through Morley, forty-two miles west of Calgary, have noticed with passing glances a small frame building just East of the Station and outside the railway’s right-of-way fence. Few if any small Trading Posts in the West have a more interesting history than this insignificant small structure. […] Read more


History: Weapons that Won the West – Part 6

Reprinted from the August 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Weapons that Won the West – Part 6 By D. R. King, High River, Alta. ‘1854 was year that the gunsmith partnership of Smith & Wesson brought out their first pistol. Undoubtedly you know what a lever-action rifle looks like. Well, take the lever action, put it into a handgun and you will have a […] Read more



History: Home on the Kootenay Plains

Reprinted from the August 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Home on the Kootenay Plains By John Laurie, Calgary, Alta. ‘”My children are hungry; they cry in the night. My young men have empty stomachs and there is no meat in my camp. So I and mine go back to the Kootenay Plains. There we shall have meat and the children shall grow fat and […] Read more


History: Stories in stone

Reprinted from the August 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Stories in stone By Frank Fleming, Calgary, Alta. ‘A peaceful stillness hangs heavily over the land. Through the forested mountain slopes range the grizzly, the elk, moose and mountain goat. The white man has not yet arrived in the country and the interior of British Columbia is still the exclusive home of a primitive people, the […] Read more



History: The May blizzard of 1903

Reprinted from the August 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

The May blizzard of 1903 By Mary Terrill, Medicine Hat, Alta. ‘The range was lush in this short grass country of southern Alberta in the spring of 1903. It was the lushness of two immediately preceding years of ample snowfall, and an abundance of rain in the growing season, followed by an early spring in the […] Read more


History: A Ranch Calendar, Pt. 2

Reprinted from the December 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Above are the last six months of the ranch calendar drawings by Canadian Cattlemen artist Bert Smith that were exhibited at the Western Stock Growers Association’s 54th Annual Convention.



History: Homesteading in the Hand Hills

Reprinted from the August 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Homesteading in the Hand Hills By Harvey Hanson, Balzac, Alta. ‘In a previous article in the “Canadian Cattlemen” I told how a portion of the Palliser Triangle in Alberta at one time had people on nearly every quarter section and how you can now drive for miles and not see a soul. It is that […] Read more


History: Up-to-Date on Foot and Mouth Disease

Reprinted from the August 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

(Taken from the June, 1950, issue “The Agricultural Situation”, U.S. Department of Agriculture) ‘Foot-and-mouth disease has been menacing the livestock industry of the United States from below our southern border for the past 3 years. The plague appeared late in 1946 in an explosive outbreak that spread through central Mexico, covering an area of over 200,000 […] Read more