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History: Lethbridge, South Alberta’s Thriving City

Reprinted from the February 1951 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Lethbridge, South Alberta’s Thriving City  By H. G. Long, Lethbridge, Alta. ‘Lethbridge had its beginnings in coal and cattle. Host city to the 55th annual convention of the Western Stock Growers’ Association Feb. 8th and 9th, Lethbridge in the 65 years of its existence has grown to be a city of some 23,000 serving a […] Read more


History: The Romance of Leather and Its Importance to Mankind

Reprinted from the February 1951 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

The Romance of Leather and Its Importance to Mankind Reprinted through the courtesy of the Tanners’ Council of America ‘Some of the most important dates in the history of mankind will never be known – the most anyone can do is guess about them. When did people first use fire? When was salt first used? […] Read more



History: From Gypsy Boy to Cattle King

Reprinted from the February 1951 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

From Gypsy Boy to Cattle King By P. W. Luce, Vancouver, B.C. ‘There hangs in the Kamloops museum an enlarged portrait of Johnny Wilson, one of the striking personalities of the early days of the cattle industry in British Columbia. The frame is heavy and ornate in the style of the nineties, and the picture […] Read more


History: Winter Feed with Spring Flooding

Reprinted from the February 1951 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Winter Feed with Spring Flooding R. E. McKenzie, Forage Plants Division, Experimental Station, Swift Current, Sask. ‘Winter feed is one of the most important factors in the successful operation of the livestock industry in Western Canada. The rancher may survive low prices, disease epidemics and other troubles but he cannot stay in business very long […] Read more



History: One Man’s Opinion

Reprinted from the January 1951 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

By Richard I Needham Originally published in the Jan. 24, 1951 Calgary Herald It’s beginning to look as though the British will have to become vegetarians. Their meat ration is now at an all-time low — lower than it was during the German submarine blockade of World War Two — and it’s likely to go […] Read more


History: A Territories Shepherd

Reprinted from the January 1951 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

A Territories Shepherd By J. F. MacCallum, Swift Current, Sask. ‘I was born on June 6, 1882, at Inverary, Argyleshire, Scotland… I arrived in Moose Jaw on March 20, 1898. It was twenty-five degrees below zero. It was very cold weather for me to experience at the beginning. Moose Jaw then had a population of […] Read more



History: A Proposed New Method of Assessing Land for Tax Purposes

Reprinted from the January 1951 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

A Proposed New Method of Assessing Land for Tax Purposes By T. H. Freeman, Director of Assessments for Saskatchewan ‘As a preface to the subject, it might be advisable to review very briefly the methods used in the past for assessing grazing land or what is technically described as Land Class 1. In 1939 a […] Read more


History: Modern Horse Training

Reprinted from the January 1951 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Modern Horse Training By Jack Sproule, Calgary, Alta. ‘This article is based entirely on my own practical experience in the training of horses, no part of it has been derived from any educational system or books, It has been written because I feel people who are horse-minded will benefit by this system of training as […] Read more



History: The Pig that Squealed for War

Reprinted from the January 1951 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

The Pig that Squealed for War By P. W. Luce, Vancouver, B.C. ‘In 1859 one “Ly” Cutler, a hot-tempered Yankee, shot a Hudson’s Bay Company’s pig which was ravaging his potato patch on San Juan Island. By right of occupation for sixteen years, the Company claimed the territory as a British possession, but the claim […] Read more


History: Honouring a Farmer-Poet

Abridged from the January 1951 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Honouring a Farmer-Poet By Kerry Wood, Red Deer, Alta. Four hundred farmers and their families met on Labor Day to stage one of the most unique ceremonies ever held in Western Canada, when the pioneer Icelandic community of Markerville in Central Alberta unveiled a monument honoring the famous farmer-poet, Stephan G. Stephansson. Dominion, provincial, and […] Read more