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Out of control grass fire spread by strong wind

History: The worst fire I ever saw

Reprinted from the July 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

The worst fire I ever saw By Mrs. S. E. Warren, Vauxhall, Alta. ‘Not long ago the Lethbridge Herald printed an account of a prairie fire in the south-east of the province in early homestead days. As the oldtimer read the story he was reminded of another prairie fire, – “The worst fire I ever […] Read more


History: A Ranch Calendar

Reprinted from the June 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Pictured above is a ranch calendar depicting ranch scenes in-season for half the year. This series was prepared by Bert Smith, Canadian Cattlemen artist, and exhibited for the first time at the 54th Annual Convention of the Western Stock Growers Association, held in Calgary, Alta. on February 9 and 10, 1950.



History: Chief Justice William C. Ives, “The Cowboy Judge”

Reprinted from the June 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Chief Justice William C. Ives, “The Cowboy Judge” By Guy Weadick, High River, Alta. ‘”He’s a top hand!” That expression is the highest degree that can be conferred on a cowpuncher on anybody’s range, in the sure-enough cow-country. It denotes about as near perfection as can ever be expected. Through the years that he spent […] Read more


History: Weapons that Won the West – Part 5

Reprinted from the June 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Weapons that Won the West By D. R. King, High River, Alta. ‘In the year 1834 young Samuel Colt, later to be known as Colonel Colt, set up an armaments factory at Passaic Falls near Paterson, New Jersey. The power to run the works was drawn from the falls itself and the old factory was […] Read more



History: Compensation for T.B. Reactors Found in Restricted Area Testing

Reprinted from the May 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

By Dr. E.E. Ballantyne, director of Veterinary Services, Edmonton, Alta. Because it is compulsory to dispose of reactors to the test for tuberculosis, the Dominion Government pays compensation for such animals so that the owner will be helped to build his herd with healthy cattle. Compensation on purebred cattle is up to $100 and grades […] Read more


History: Old Cow-Wagon Days

Reprinted from the June 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Old Cow-Wagon Days By E. J. (Bud) Cotton, 2022 – 27th St. S.W., Calgary, Alta. ‘The summer of 1909 found us with our chuck wagon drifting a herd of beef steers among the coulees and flats of the Kneehill and Rosebud creeks in Alberta. We had picked the herd up early that spring from the […] Read more



History: Calgary – the Heart of the West

Reprinted from the June 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Calgary – the Heart of the West By Lorne Stout, Calgary, Alta. ‘Seventy-five years! Just a life span for a man, and for a City. Calgary this Summer marking its 75th birthday, ranks as one of the youngest cities on the continent, but has attained a prominence far outreaching its age or size. Heart of […] Read more


History: Harry Garfield Minor, 1881-1949

Reprinted from the June 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Harry Garfield Minor, 1881-1949 ‘The life-story of Harry Minor would not be complete without telling of his love and great respect for horses. In the early 1900’s he had a horse named Frank. Frank was one of a two car shipment of horses which the Minors shipped from Nebraska when they came to Canada. There were […] Read more



History: Rodeo reminiscences

Reprinted from the May 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Rodeo reminiscences By Harvey Hanson, Balzac, Alta. ‘With the opening of sales of Calgary Stampede tickets to the public on February 1st and looking over my tickets, my thoughts go back to a stampede in Alberta thirty-six years ago that was not much heralded, was hardly heard of and was not sponsored by the “Big […] Read more


History: Edwin Aubrey Cartwright of the D Ranch (Part 2)

Abridged from the May 1950 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Edwin Aubrey Cartwright of the D Ranch (Part 2) By Guy Weadick, High River, Alta. The 86 ranch was established in the middle ’80s when George Lane, then range boss for the Bar U outfit, staked out his homestead along the banks of Pekisko Creek, hired a couple of men to get out logs and […] Read more