W. Prairies to see drier weather, but drydown will be tough

CNS Canada — Parts of the western Prairies that have been bogged down by wet, cool weather should see drier conditions as the month rolls along, according to a weather expert.

However, that still doesn’t mean wet crops are going to dry out anytime soon, according to Drew Lerner of World Weather Inc. in Kansas City.

“Wet and cooler weather will make it tough to dry down, but fortunately there shouldn’t be any large storms coming across the region for a while,” he said.

This week’s Saskatchewan crop report revealed how difficult it has been for some of that province’s northern areas to complete harvest.

One area in the northwest received 399 millimetres of rainfall since April 1 while many other crops came off tough and had to be aerated. The harvest in that part of the province was gauged to be 12 per cent behind the five-year average.

Northern Saskatchewan and other areas bogged down by rainy weather should see drier conditions in the middle and end of October, Lerner said, but that doesn’t mean all the rain is going away.

“We’re not going to have large storms impacting the region for a while, but the smaller events will still be of interest because we might not dry down real well,” he said.

Cold weather is coming to the eastern Prairies as well, he said. “From the 15th (of October) to the 21st we will probably encounter colder weather in the eastern half of the Prairies.”

The El Nino weather event that has gripped much of the world should also spark less precipitation but Lerner said he believes that bias will be more pronounced in November and December.

Dave Sims writes for Commodity News Service Canada, a Winnipeg company specializing in grain and commodity market reporting.

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