GFM Network News


“Trying to produce crops that are not suited to your soils leads to low yields, high production costs and a higher land requirement to meet production goals.

Yield and quality pillars of forage production

Grow well-adapted varieties and match your forages to soil and climate conditions

When it comes to cost of production and efficiency, Bill Thomas considers yield and quality to be the two pillars of forage production. In order to keep these pillars standing strong, careful planning is the key to creating an effective forage production program. Thomas, retired director of Perennia’s field services division, delivered his recommendations at […] Read more

Pilot projects in each province will determine the best management practices for local areas.

Leaving the grass – and the carbon – in the ground

National project will show how forage and grassland owners can use high-performance management to boost yields and store carbon

Canadian forage producers know the value of the land they are responsible for — all 33.8 million acres of cultivated forages and 36 million of native or improved pastures. This land has a direct economic impact of $5.09 billion, but studies on the value of its environmental impact, or “ecological goods and services,” suggest it’s […] Read more


Good stewardship practices are essential for cattle producers in order to keep land productive for many years to come.

Comment: Being a good steward

From the February 2019 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

In November, I was at the Canadian Forage and Grassland Association conference in Calgary when Dr. Henry Janzen delivered an inspiring opening keynote. Janzen, quoting environmental scientist Donella Meadows, suggested we pay attention to what is important, not just what we can measure. Often we evaluate systems based on only what we can measure, he […] Read more

Cattle graze at the Waldron Ranch Grazing Co-op, which encompasses 65,000 acres.

Historic ranch provides top grazing opportunities for cattle

Waldron Ranch has been a cattle producer’s paradise since Duncan McNab McEachran established it in 1883

You know a winter range is excellent grazing land when a cow will cross every fence she can to get there. Mike Roberts, manager of the Waldron Ranch Grazing Co-op, pointed out a herd of cows grazing in low-lying pastures while hosting participants of the Canadian Forage and Grassland Association’s pre-conference tour in November. This […] Read more


Cattlemen welcomes new editor in New Year

NewsMakers from the December 2018 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Lisa Guenther of Livelong, Sask., will become the editor of Canadian Cattlemen in January 2019. She was raised on a commercial cow-calf farm near Bright Sand Lake, Sask., and joined Cattlemen as associate editor in October. Previously she worked as a field editor for Grainews and Country Guide, sister publications to the Cattlemen. She replaces […] Read more

Tim Lehrbass traded his combine for cattle

Ontario grower decides to graze cattle on his cash crop

Tim Lehrbass was just like any other Ontario farm kid, taking farm cues from his family and doing things the way things needed to be done and, in many ways, the way things had always been done. “I started out cash cropping,” he told a crowd at the Canadian Forage and Grassland Association annual conference […] Read more


Forage testing more complicated, but rations more accurate

Forage testing has evolved significantly in the past three to five years, with more precise tools for livestock ration development

Forage quality evaluation has moved from rule of thumb to rule of rumen. Mark Bowman, a ruminant nutritionist with Grand Valley Fortifiers in Cambridge, Ont., told the annual meeting of the Canadian Forage and Grassland Association in Guelph last November that forage testing has evolved significantly in the past three to five years, with more […] Read more

Putting a value on forages

A new project by the Canadian Forage and Grassland Association will establish protocols for high-performance forage management

With over 70 million acres of dedicated Canadian cropland and a direct economic value of $5.09 billion, forages are the country’s third-largest crop, just behind wheat valued at $5.2 billion and canola at $7.3 billion. There’s no doubt forages are good for the economy. Perennial forages play an environmental role with the ability to reduce […] Read more


Species at risk adds new emphasis to managing grasslands

New project looks at satellite mapping Canada’s range and forage lands

The management of species at risk on pasture, rangelands and wild lands is an issue of considerable interest to most cattle producers. As a result it was highlighted at a workshop jointly sponsored by Environment and Climate Change Canada during the International Rangeland Congress in Saskatoon last summer. Several provincial environmental farm plans and producer-run […] Read more

The sixth annual Canadian Forage and Grassland Association conference was held in Saskatoon on November 17 to 19.

Onward and upward for the CFGA

Notes from the Canadian Forage and Grassland Association annual conference

The Canadian Forage and Grassland Association drew the year to a close on a high note coming out of its annual conference at Saskatoon in November. As the theme, “Capturing the Intensity” suggests, the event offered a lineup of insightful presenters on an array of topics from intensive forage management systems and soil health to […] Read more