GFM Network News


History: Economics & Cattle Ranching Changing

Reprinted from the February 1952 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Economics & Cattle Ranching Changing By Mont S. Saunderson ‘Recently at a meeting of the American Society of Range Management, I was having a pleasant visit with Mr. J. A. “Scotty” Campbell, of your Alberta Department of Lands and Forests. Somehow the conversation got around to the subject of how we might exchange more western […] Read more

History: Gleaned from the Pioneer Pages

Reprinted from the November 1951 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Gleaned from the Pioneer Pages By Grant MacEwan ‘Nor’-West Farmer, Oct. 1883. – “Barbed wire as a prairie fence is rapidly coming into use in Manitoba. It is by far the most sensible fence which can be adopted by our farmers; and the wood (rails) can be used for much more necessary purposes.” Calgary Triune, […] Read more


The historic 105 Mile House (l) and the four-place Beechcraft Bononza.

History: A Dream Come True

Reprinted from the November 1951 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

A Dream Come True By A. J. Dalrymple, Vancouver, B.C. ‘This is a story about a man who searched the continent for what he wanted, and finally found it in B.C.’s beautiful Cariboo country. Let me introduce Fred Davis of Madera, Calif., a tall, rugged, working cattleman, quiet of voice and manner, hospitable, generous, fun-loving, […] Read more

Les Gilmore and herd in Peavine Valley.

History: B. C. Rancher Picks Peavine Valley

Reprinted from the January 1952 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

B. C. Rancher Picks Peavine Valley By A. J. Dalrymple, Vancouver, B. C. ‘When the pioneers were pushing northward through the Cariboo to the gold bars of the Fraser, the Horsefly River, the diggings of Barkerville, and other points, they crossed two streams just beyond Williams Lake; and with the grim humor of the day, […] Read more


History: As the Cattleman Sees the Problem of World Nutrition

Reprinted from the December 1951 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

As the Cattleman Sees the Problem of World Nutrition By Gran MacEwen, Associate Editor ‘If someone were to ask, “What is a farmer or rancher?”, a reasonable answer would be “a manufacturer”. Perhaps he cannot qualify for membership in the Canadian Manufacturer’s Association but still his main purpose is to direct the manufacture of carbohydrates, […] Read more

History: Stampede Managers and Contestants Meet

Reprinted from the January 1952 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Stampede Managers and Contestants Meet By Lorne Stout, Calgary, Alta. ‘The Cowboys and Canadian Stampede Manager’s Associations held their annual meeting in Calgary in an atmosphere of cordiality marking a high in relations between the C.S.M.A. and the Cowboy’s Protective Association. There was none of the wrangling that has marked some sessions in the past. […] Read more


History: Big Gap Stampede

Reprinted from the January 1951 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Big Gap Stampede By Mrs. Anne E. Spreight, Cairns, Alta. There have been many famous stampedes, but one of the most unique was the Rancher’s Roundup and Barbecue. It started simply enough. A number of ranchers in the Neutral Hills of Central Alberta wanted to hold a get together with the usual western attractions. It […] Read more

History: The 76 Ranch on the Powder River: Part 2

Reprinted from the December 1951 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

The 76 Ranch on the Powder River: Part 2 By Herbert O. Brayer ‘During the period of stress, Frewen evolved the spectacular plan of shipping literally millions of head of range cattle to meat-hungry Britain for finishing and marketing. It was this program that first earned him international attention and no little fame. The plan […] Read more


History: The 76 Ranch on the Powder River: Part 1

Reprinted from the November 1951 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

History: The 76 Ranch on the Powder River: Part 1 By Herbert O. Brayer ‘Seventy years ago, on July 27, 1880 a trail herd if 2,500 Oregon bred cattle was slowly wending its way across the rolling, sage covered hills of southwestern Idaho enroute to still virgin ranges on the Powder River in Wyoming. The […] Read more

The ‘D. A. Thomas’ carried settlers and trading supplies up the Peace to Fort St. John. She also took out settlers’ produce and livestock.

History: Pathfinding Beyond the Peace (conclusion)

Reprinted from the December 1951 issue of Canadian Cattlemen


Pathfinding Beyond the Peace By Philip H. Godsell, F.R.G.S. , Former Inspecting Officer for the Hudson’s Bay Company ‘Leaving the Fontas River we paddled to Fort Nelson, and hundred miles to the northward where I found Mr. Hooker of the Hudson’s Bay Company. After vainly attempting to negotiate a swift Sickannie Chief River and push […] Read more