Pulse weekly outlook: Healthy demand for heat-stricken Manitoba pulses 

Photo: File

MarketsFarm – If Manitoba’s pea harvest is any indication, the province’s pulse crops will be largely deteriorated by the hot and dry weather affecting all of Western Canada, according to Manitoba Pulse & Soybean Growers executive director Daryl Domitruk.

“It has affected (pulses) like it has affected most of the other crops, in that severe moisture stress has really limited yield potential and significantly reduced biomass production,” he said. Domitruk added that while it is still too early to say how much soybeans and dry beans have been affected, this year’s peas have been of variable quality due to differing levels of precipitation.

“We will probably see pea yields all over the map this year, tending towards the lower side,” he said. “There will be fields that will be certainly lower than 10 bushels (per acre). Then, we know that some crops, particularly in western Manitoba, were looking decent as recently as last week.”

Reduced yields for pulses and other crops in Manitoba will give a boost to prices, but the demand for the province’s pulses hasn’t waned, said Domitruk.

“Edible beans were down a bit from last year, but it’s a good solid crop, good solid market, so we had a nice acreage being planted this year. Those prices were reasonable, if not really high,” he explained, adding that peas have seen greater local demand due to processors such as Roquette.

“The outlook is a good as the next market analysis based on supply and demand. It does appear there’s some strength remaining and it’s such a weather market. We’ll see how things go,” Domitruk said. “The demand is what it is and it’s very consistent across our crops.”

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