Pulses: Imports arriving in India, new pea protein products

CNS Canada — Following are a few highlights in the Canadian and world pulse markets on Thursday morning, Oct. 8.

• Imported supplies of arhar dal (pigeon peas) are starting to help ease rising domestic pulse prices in India, according to reports from the country. Poor local production this year should keep India as a major buyer in the global pulse markets this year.

• The dry edible bean harvest in North Dakota was 95 per cent complete as of Oct. 4, which is well ahead of the five-year average of 73 per cent complete, according to USDA data. In Minnesota the dry edible bean harvest is also nearly complete.

• Glanbia Nutritionals of Wisconsin has developed a new pea protein — HarvestPro Pea Protein 83EF — that offers “significantly lower bitter green pea notes than other samples,” according to a company press release. Axiom Foods of California has also introduced a new green pea protein product with a supposedly “neutral” taste. The new products highlight the growing consumer demand for plant-based protein sources, which should be supportive for North American producers.

• While the issues in India are supportive for Canadian pulses, local bids are holding relatively steady for the time being. Spot bids for large No. 2 lentils are topping out in the 40 to 43 cents per pound area, according to a cross-section of posted prices. No. 2 medium and smaller greens top out in the 30 to 38 cents per pound range. Pricing for No. 2 or better red lentils can be found in the 35 to 40 cent range.

• Green pea prices in the C$7.50 to $8 per bushel range are being reported, while prices as high as C$9 per bushel can be found for yellow peas. Large caliber chickpeas are trading in the 35 to 36 cents per pound (delivered elevator) area, with discounts for smaller Kabulis and Desis.

• The feed pea benchmark compiled by the Saskatchewan Pulse Growers and Alberta Pulse Growers ranged from C$275 per tonne in Manitoba to as high as C$327 per tonne in Saskatchewan during the two-week period ended Sept. 30. Those values are down slightly from the previous reporting period.

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