GFM Network News


Dung beetles break down manure on grasslands and convert it into plant nutrients. They also facilitate water infiltration and soil aeration.

Dung beetles may be small but they play a big role on pastures

These beetles turn manure into nutrients, improving the soil, increasing water infiltration and cutting pest fly populations

On pasture ecosystems, the spotlight is often on grass and cattle, yet a well-functioning grassland may depend, at least in part, on behind-the-scenes work performed by dung beetles. With a skillset that includes converting manure into nutrients, improving soil aeration, minimizing pest flies and increasing water infiltration, dung beetles can help beef producers set the […] Read more

The cow is a big part of ranching, but she is only a part of it.

The mobile hotel

From the Ground Up with Steve Kenyon

If you own your own business, you know one of the most difficult tasks is acquiring and holding onto good employees. We all know that it’s important to provide desirable working conditions to keep employees happy. We try our best here at Greener Pastures Ranching, but there is one other aspect that we work on […] Read more


Quebec ag co-op to power up on dairy cattle manure

About a dozen Quebec dairy farms will be getting their collective manure together next year for the province’s first-ever ag co-operative devoted to renewable natural gas. Coop Agri-Energie Warwick, launched Monday, plans to start construction this spring on a $12 million biomethanization plant which will take in slurry and manure from dairy cattle mixed with […] Read more

Kenyon: ‘Shoo, Fly Guy!’

This was one of my favourite children’s story books that I used to read to my son. It was about a boy and his fly friend. His name was Fly Guy. They had many adventures together and we enjoyed the series a great deal. They were written by Ted Arnold. My point? Flies can be […] Read more


Researchers are studying what might happen if livestock were removed from the landscape.

Research solidifies cattle’s role in soil health

British scientist argues that higher stocking rates and uniform distribution of animals lead to better soil structure

Glacier FarmMedia – Long-term grasslands studies have made researchers like Taro Takahashi a believer in the environmental value of livestock and grazing. Takahashi is a research scientist whose work at Rothamsted Research in Hertfordshire, England, includes a life-cycle assessment of pasture-based cattle production systems. Rothamsted Research is one of the oldest agriculture research institutions in […] Read more

Bale grazing. ‘What a waste of feed!’ NO

Grazing with Steve Kenyon

I still receive this comment quite often when I speak about bale grazing. Our industry is hung up on being efficient. We don’t want to waste anything. I know we have all been trained to target 97 per cent efficiency in everything we do. But I would rather be effective. Most of our efficiencies come from looking at […] Read more



In a well managed pasture, dung beetles can help reduce methane emissions.

Dung beetles make the best employees

Grazing with Steve Kenyon

This is how we roll. Or maybe we dig, or just hang out, but no matter how we work, we work really hard. We have a really crappy job and I would like to tell you a little bit about us. We are known as scarab beetles, commonly called dung beetles. We have a very important job […] Read more


A bull recovering from foot rot, which can be caused when cattle avoiding flies stand in water for long periods.

Fly bites a nuisance that can also lead to foot rot

Chemical controls and pasture rotation are options for control of stable flies

Fly problems are prevalent in some parts of North Dakota this year, North Dakota State University Extension livestock specialists warn. Horn, face and stable flies all are irritating to cattle, but stable flies have been particularly bothersome. “They will bite and irritate the animals on the legs and belly, and control of these pests is […] Read more

Cattle from Living Sky Beef graze a cover crop on Axten Farms near Minton, Sask.

Sharing cattle and cropland

A way to capture nutrients and opportunities


A few decades ago, the practice of growing both crops and cattle on the same farm was far more common than it is now. Today’s no-till, organic, and conventional crop producers, however, are paying close attention to soil health and crop inputs. The potential benefits of incorporating cattle back onto their farms are leading to […] Read more