GFM Network News

History: Cornelius (Neil) Jahnke laid to rest

Reprinted from the July 1952 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Cornelius (Neil) Jahnke laid to rest ‘One of Saskatchewan’s widely known and most respected old-timers passed away in the Herbert-Morse Union Hospital early Friday afternoon, May 16, at the age of 72. Neil Jahnke had suffered a year of ill health. At the funeral which followed on May 20, thousands of sorrowing friends came to […] Read more

History: The First World Wheat King

Reprinted from the April 1952 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

The First World Wheat King By Robert E. Campbell, 1007 Fairfield Road, Victoria, B.C. ‘J. Gough Brick was born in Shaftesbury, England. Entering mercantile life, his manner of living and character of his work soon brought him the notice of his employers and promotion followed. Soon he felt himself in a position to take unto […] Read more


History: Mekaisto – Red Crow

Reprinted from the June 1952 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Mekaisto – Red Crow By John Laurie, Calgary, Alta. ‘If civilization can tame the buffalo so that they are like cattle, the lesson is one that I shall not forget easily.” When Mekaisto – Red Crow – Head Chief of the Bloods was on tour to Eastern Canada, he was shown the tame buffalo as […] Read more

Geo. A. Lamond.

History: Memories of Scottish Stables and Royal Riders

Reprinted from the July 1952 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Memories of Scottish Stables and Royal Riders (As recalled by George Andrew Lamond of Vauxhall, Alberta) Mrs. S.E. Warren, Vauxhall, Alta. ‘Beside the gravelled highway that runs through the little town of Vauxhall an Alberta old-timer lives alone with this memories. Seated in the old armchair his wife occupied until she passed away a couple […] Read more


Robert Sinton.

History: Robert Sinton, Pioneer

Reprinted from the August 1952 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Robert Sinton, Pioneer By May Neal, Regina, Sask. The long, long life of Robert Sinton, Regina’s Grand Old Pioneer, parallels the development of the Western Livestock Industry from its beginning. He was born in Quebec in May 1854 of parents who immigrated to Canada from Scotland in 1830. In 1878, when Sinton was 24 years […] Read more

Wilf Hodgson of Dorothy, Alta. shown working on one of his Juniper carvings.

History: The Rancher is An Artist

Reprinted from the July 1952 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

The Rancher is An Artist By Lyn Harrington ‘Wilf Hodgson laid down the cottonwood bark he was carving into an Indian head in low relief. He reached for his hat, muttering, “That cow’s been bawling all morning. Likely her calf’s fallen into a sink-hole.” That was precisely what had happened. After he rescued the calf, […] Read more


History: A Hut in the Bear Hills

Reprinted from the December 1946 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

A Hut in the Bear Hills By Harold Baldwin, Swift Current, Saskatchewan ‘Whenever Saskatchewan dons her autumn robes; when the potatoes are dug and the corn stalks in the garden turn a russet colour; when a thought of fire in the open grate is a delight; when the first echelons of wild geese thrust southward; […] Read more

History: Akinoskway

Reprinted from the July 1952 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

Akinoskway By Mrs. Freda Smith Mudiman, Swift Current, Sask. ‘Plains Indians wandering from the South Saskatchewan to the Milk River liked to camp beside a stream that flowed southwesterly from the Cypress Hills to Pakowi Lake in Southeastern Alberta. Here they found wood and water and in season, wild fruit to vary their heavy meat […] Read more


History: A fur trading post renews its youth

Reprinted from the July 1952 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

A fur trading post renews its youth By Mrs. Anna Speight Situated 100 miles south and 60 miles west of Edmonton is a village better known than any other place of its size in Canada. Long before Edmonton and Calgary were established many trails led to Rocky Mountain House. In 1790, the first white man, […] Read more

Charles Beil of Banff, famous cowboy sculptor in his studio.

History: The Cowboys’ Sculptor

Reprinted from the June 1952 issue of Canadian Cattlemen

The Cowboy Sculptor By Lyn Harrington ‘When the famous Calgary Stampede rolls round each July, ranchers and business men throughout Alberta and the surrounding countryside are milling around, finishing up this and that, preparing to take a week off for the big event. No one is busier than Charles Beil, cowboy sculptor of Banff. For […] Read more